~~~~The Old Liner~~~~
- Online edition of newsletter -

Join the Baltimore Civil War Roundtable to receive the complete edition of "The Old Liner"!

Previous Meetings:  1999-2015 
Meeting: December 13, 2016
Our speaker this month will be Frank Armiger.

The December 13 meeting will focus on the second day of the Battle of Gettysburg. Frank Armiger will feature an extensive Power Point presentation covering the second day of the noted battle. The Day III presentation will be scheduled for 2017.

Frank is a native of the Baltimore area. He was born in South Baltimore and grew up in north Anne Arundel County. He currently resides in Timonium with his wife Susan. Frank is a graduate of The Johns Hopkins University where he earned a BA in Business and Industrial Engineering. He is currently self-employed as a health care antifraud consultant specializing in Medicare and Medicaid detection and prevention. Frank is a long time Civil War buff dating back to the Centennial celebration. He is particularly interested in the Battle of Gettysburg and has visited the battlefield many times over the past 50+ years. Frank is the Editor of the Maryland Line, the newsletter of the Maryland Military Historical Society (MDMHS). He is also the President of the Curtis B Vickery Round Table of Military History where he has been a regular speaker.

Iron Brigade Monument – Stony Hill, GNMP

 


Meeting: November 25, 2016
Our speaker this month and next will be Frank Armiger.
The November 22 and the December 13 meetings will focus on the Battle of Gettysburg. Frank Arminger will feature an extensive Power Point presentation of the first and second day of the noted battle during consecutive meetings. The Day III presentation will be scheduled for 2017.

Frank is a native of the Baltimore area. He was born in South Baltimore and grew up in north Anne Arundel County. He currently resides in Timonium with his wife Susan. Frank is a graduate of The Johns Hopkins University where he earned a BA in Business and Industrial Engineering. He is currently self-employed as a health care antifraud consultant specializing in Medicare and Medicaid detection and prevention. Frank is a long time Civil War buff dating back to the Centennial celebration. He is particularly interested in the Battle of Gettysburg and has visited the battlefield many times over the past 50+ years. Frank is the Editor of the Maryland Line, the newsletter of the Maryland Military Historical Society (MDMHS). He is also the President of the Curtis B Vickery Round Table of Military History where he has been a regular speaker.

Monument at site where General Reynolds fell –July 1, 1863

 


Meeting: October 25, 2016
Our speaker will be author and Lincoln Assassination expert Jim Garrett. Mr. Garrett will focus on local people involved in the assassination and where they are now, telling the stories of some of the over sixty individuals who lie buried within the boundaries of the District of Columbia, and were in some way, associated with or impacted by the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln in April of 1865. They include conspirators, government officials, tradesmen and everyday citizens who are forever tied together by the event that shook everyone in the United States, North and South, to their core.

Jim is a life-long Lincoln Assassination and Booth enthusiast, a volunteer at Ford’s Theatre and a tour guide for Washington DC’s Old Town Trolley Tours. He also conducts tours of the Booth family home, Tudor Hall He is a co-author of The Lincoln Assassination: Where Are they Now? A Guide to the Burial Places of Individuals Connected to the Lincoln Assassination in Washington, D.C. and The Flags of Ford’s Theatre.

John Wilkes Booth 


Meeting: September 27, 2016
Our speaker will be William S. Connery. Mr. Connery will discuss his History Press book Mosby’s raids in Civil War Northern Virginia.

The most famous War Between the States name in Northern Virginia, other than General Robert E. Lee, is Colonel John S. Mosby, aka the Gray Ghost. He stands out among nearly 1,000 generals who served in the war, celebrated mostly for his raids that captured Union general Edwin Stoughton in Fairfax Court House and Colonel Daniel French Dulany in Rose Hill, near Alexandria. By 1864, he was a feared partisan guerrilla in the North and a nightmare for Union troops protecting Washington City. After the war, his support for presidential candidate Ulysses S. Grant forced Mosby to leave his native Virginia for Hong Kong as U.S. Consul. A personal mentor to young George S. Patton, Mosby’s military legacy extended to World War II.

William Connery grew up in Baltimore, Maryland. He has a degree in history from University of Maryland–College Park. Mr. Connery has contributed to the Civil War Courier, the Washington Times Civil War page and other publications. In 2012, he was awarded the prestigious Jefferson Davis Historical Gold Medal for his first History Press book, Civil War Northern Virginia 1861.

Colonel John Singleton Mosby, CSA


Meeting: August 23, 2016
Our speaker will be Taryn A. Weaver aka Harriet Tubman. Taryn A. Weaver is a Christian, a businessperson, an animal lover, a warrior for peace, an actor, a songwriter, a storyteller, and a woman of substance and inspiration.

She has performed on the Smithsonian Channel in the documentary “Civil War 360” as a field slave and has portrayed “Harriett Tubman” at the Afro American Historical Museum, and several churches and schools in Bealeton, Culpeper, Front Royal, and Warrenton, Virginia.

She has graduated twice from Lord Fairfax Community College in Virginia. In 2012, she graduated Summa Cum Laude with a Certificate in ‘Office Legal Assistant/Paralegal Studies’. She was installed into the Phi Theta Kappa International Honor Society while a student in Paralegal Studies. In 2014, she graduated Magna Cum Laude with an Associate of Applied Science degree in ‘Management’.

Once a week during Black History Month in February 2017, she will be undertaking the venture “Come and Meet Harriett Tubman” at the Afro American Historical Museum in The Plains, Virginia.

She is married to her best friend, Dr. Ellsworth L. B. Weaver, who often accompanies her with his musical talents when she is performing as Harriett Tubman and at other events. They reside in Bealeton, Virginia and share their home with their dog, Miss Sadie, and their cat, Miss Jingles.

Harriet Tubman  in 1885

 


Meeting: July 26, 2016
Our speaker this month will be Annette T. Khawane, Adjunct Professor of Mortuary Sciences at Catonsville Community College. She will discuss the work of Doctor Thomas Holmes,
Dr. Thomas Holmes was born in New York in 1817.  He attended public schools and New York University Medical College, though there are no records of him graduating.  However, in the 1850's he did practice medicine  and was a coroner's physician in New York.  In the 1850's Dr. Holmes perfected what we know today as modern embalming techniques. He is generally acknowledged as the "Father of Modern Embalming".  When the Civil War broke out he opened an embalming office in Washington, DC.  Colonel Ellsworth became his first prominent client.  Dr. Holmes was responsible for preparing about 4000 bodies to be sent home.  During his lifetime he was also awarded many patents for inventions related to embalming.  Holmes secured his place in history when Lincoln’s wife, Mary Todd, personally asked him to embalm her husband after his assassination. In addition to Col. Ellsworth, Holmes performed the task for the Lincolns’ son, Willie, when he died of typhus in 1862.
Following the War he returned to his home in Brooklyn, New York. Oddly enough, before his death in 1900 he requested that he not be embalmed.

Dr. Richard Burr, an embalming surgeon in Frederick, Va., is shown embalming a 

soldier recovered from the battlefield. Embalming tables were not usually available 

in the field, so he used a door placed over two large barrels. Photo courtesy of the 

National Museum of Civil War Medicine.


Meeting: June 28, 2016
Our speaker this month will be Ed Bonekemper. He will speak on “The Lost Cause”. Note: This is a make up for the presentation scheduled for January but cancelled due to inclement weather.

Ed Bonekemper earned a B.A., cum laude, in American history from Muhlenberg College, an M.A. in American history from Old Dominion University, and a J.D. from Yale Law School.

He is the author of six Civil War books:
The Myth of the Lost Cause: Why the South Fought the Civil War and Why the North Won;
Lincoln and Grant: The Westerners Who Won the Civil War;
Grant and Lee: Victorious American and Vanquished Virginian;
McClellan and Failure: A Study of Civil War Fear, Incompetence and Worse;
A Victor, Not a Butcher: Ulysses S. Grant’s Overlooked Military Genius, and How Robert E. Lee Lost the Civil War.


He is the Book Review Editor of Civil War News and was an adjunct lecturer in military history at Muhlenberg College from 2003 to 2010.

Jubal Early

 


Meeting: May 24, 2016
Our speaker this month is David Langrehr of the Hanger Company. He will tell the story of the Company’s founder, former Confederate soldier James Edward Hanger.

On June 1, 1861, 18-year-old engineering student James Edward Hanger left his family, forgoing his studies at Washington College (now Washington & Lee University), to join his brothers in the Confederate Army. On June 3, less than two days after enlisting, a cannonball tore through his leg early in the Battle of Philippi resulting in one of the first battlefield amputations.

A prisoner of war until August 1861, upon returning home to Churchville, Virginia, Hanger requested solitude. His family assumed he was in despair; however, unbeknownst to anyone else, he immediately began work on what would prove to be a revolutionary prosthetic solution.

Whittled from barrel staves, the “Hanger Limb” was first worn by Hanger in November 1861 as he descended the steps of his home, to the astonishment of his family who didn’t know what he was doing while locked away for months in his upstairs bedroom.

In the same year, Hanger secured two patents from the Confederate government. In 1891, Hanger was granted a U.S. patent for his prosthetic innovation.

By the time of his death in June 1919, the J.E. Hanger Company had branches in Atlanta, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, St. Louis, London, and Paris.

James Edward Hanger 

– Photo courtesy Hanger Inc.

 


Meeting: April 26, 2016
This month is the Baltimore Civil War Roundtable Annual Dinner Meeting.
Dave Booz
will speak on the Battle of Sharpsburg (Antietam).

Dave Booz is an adjunct professor in the Civil War Era Studies department at Gettysburg College. He teaches at McDaniel College and Carroll Community College as well. He spent 30 years as an educator in the Carroll County, Maryland system and also works for the American Institute for History Education. He is also active in the North-South Skirmish Association and shoots competitively with Civil War firearms. He currently resides with his wife, Barbara, near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.

On September 17, 1862, Generals Robert E. Lee and George McClellan faced off near Antietam creek in Sharpsburg, Maryland, in the first battle of the American Civil War to be fought on northern soil. Though McClellan failed to utilize his numerical superiority to crush Lee’s army, he was able to check the Confederate advance into the north. After a string of Union defeats, this tactical victory provided Abraham Lincoln the political cover he needed to issue his Emancipation Proclamation. Though the result of the battle was inconclusive, it remains the bloodiest single day in American history, with more than 22,000 casualties.

Dave Booz

>>>> Annual Dinner Meeting Flyer April 26, 2016 <<<<


Meeting: March 22, 2016
Our speaker will be Daniel Carroll Toomey. He will talk on The Lincoln Funeral Train.

Daniel Carroll Toomey is a graduate of the University of Maryland and the author of ten books including The Civil War in Maryland, Marylanders at Gettysburg, and The Maryland Line Confederate Soldiers Home. He is also the co-author of Baltimore During the Civil War and Marylanders in Blue, all of which were published by Toomey Press.

Dan Toomey has won numerous awards for his historical research and exhibits including the Gettysburg National Battlefield Award in 1985 and was the 2001 recipient of the Peterkin Award given by the National Park Service at Fort McHenry in 2001 for his many accomplishments in the field of writing and preservation. He is currently the Guest Curator at the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Museum for their five-year project The War Came by Train.

His two fondest accomplishments are writing the inscription for the Maryland Monument at Gettysburg and playing on the first ever Howard County Lacrosse team in 1964.

The Lincoln funeral train would travel over 1,600 miles, utilize 25 different railroads, and take 13 days to complete it mournful journey. Daniel Carroll Toomey will cover the planning and vast amount of logistical resources committed to this signal event in American history.

DANIEL CARROLL TOOMEY

>>>> Annual Dinner Meeting Flyer April 26, 2016 <<<<

 


Meeting: February 23, 2016
Our speaker this month will be Past BCWRT President Bob Mullauer.

Bob will speak on the Battle of Nashville, Tennessee. The December 15/16, 1864 Battle of Nashville represented the end of large-scale fighting in the Western Theater. In one of the largest victories achieved by the Union Army during the war, the Union forces under General George Thomas attacked and routed The Confederate Army of Tennessee Under General John Bell Hood, largely destroying it as an effective fighting force.

Bob Mullauer was a high school history teacher for over a decade. He currently teaches night-time courses at Anne Arundel Community College as well as speaks to a variety of groups on topics such as the American Civil War in the Western Theater, World War II in the Pacific, and the Napoleonic Wars. He has led United States Army officers on staff rides over the Chickamauga and Chattanooga battlefields. His travels include tours of World War II battlefields in the Pacific as well as Normandy, the Bulge, Verdun, and various Napoleonic sites in Europe. Bob is a popular and frequent speaker before the Roundtable.

The monument to the United States Colored Troops at Nashville National Cemetery

>>>> Annual Dinner Meeting Flyer April 26, 2016 <<<<

 


Meeting: January 26, 2016

DUE TO THE CONTINUED SNOW EMERGENCY, THE MONTHLY MEETING OF THE BALTIMORE CIVIL WAR ROUNDTABLE SCHEDULED FOR TUESDAY, JANUARY 26 HAS BEEN CANCELLED!!

 

Our speaker this month will be Ed Bonekemper. He will speak on “The Lost Cause”.

Ed Bonekemper earned a B.A., cum laude, in American history 

from Muhlenberg College, an M.A. in American history from Old Dominion University, 

and a J.D. from Yale Law School.

He is the author of six Civil War books:

The Myth of tetence and Worse;

A Victor, Not a Butcher: Ulysses S. Grant’s Overlooked Military Genius, 

and How Robert E. Lee Lost the Civil War.

He is the Book Review Editor of Civil War News and was an adjunct lecturer 

in military history at Muhlenberg College from 2003 to 2010.

The Lost Cause: Why the South Fought the Civil War and Why the North Won;

Lincoln and Grant: The Westerners Who Won the Civil War;

Grant and Lee: Victorious American and Vanquished Virginian;

McClellan and Failure: A Study of Civil War Fear, Incompetance and Worse

Jubal Early


 



Previous Meetings - See what you missed by not being a member!

Join the Baltimore Civil War Roundtable to receive the complete edition of "The Old Liner"!